Tag Archives: UNICEF

UN Zambia Press Release on death of three juveniles in mine accident

LUSAKA, 22 January 2019 – The United Nations in Zambia expresses its deep sorrow at the death of three children, aged as young as eleven years old, in Zambia’s Luapula Province on Saturday during a mining accident.

“We are profoundly saddened to hear of the death of these three children, in circumstances where they appeared to be working in a manganese mine,” said Ms. Janet Rogan, United Nations Resident Coordinator in Zambia. “No child should be forced to work. Child labour is preventable, not inevitable. Every child should be free to enjoy their rights to education, protection and recreation. Every child has the right to a childhood, and to receive protection from unsafe environments. Children need to be removed immediately from the worst forms of child labour and provided with care and education.”

The United Nations family in Zambia offers its heartfelt condolences to the families of those killed, and pledges continued support to the Government of Zambia to improve education, child protection, labour standards and economic development. Sustainable Development Goal Target 8.7 which provides that States take “immediate and effective measures to…secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labour in all its forms.”

UNDP, UNICEF and the International Labour Organization (ILO) work in Zambia to improve conditions for children and young people, and enhance labour laws, regulation and work place protection. Last week, UNODC launched a new project in Zambia to combat trafficking in persons including those involved forced labour and sex trafficking.

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About UN Zambia

Through resident and non-resident funds and agencies, the United Nations in Zambia delivers as one in providing development and humanitarian support to the people of Zambia and refugees through the Zambia-United Nations Sustainable Development Partnership Framework.UN Zambia has, through the Resident Coordinator and UN Country Team made significant progress in systematically moving forward the UN reform agenda in the country, striving to reach the highest standards of accountability, transparency and impact.

For more information, please contact:

Mark Maseko, National Information Officer

UNIC Lusaka


P: +260-211-225-494 | M: + 260-955767062 | E: masekom@un.org

Goal 4 Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

By Qian Tang

Qian Tang is Assistant Director-General for Education at the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

Goal 4 Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

Goal 4 Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

A collective sigh of relief was heard from the international education community when the sustainable development goals (SDGs) proposed by the Open Working Group (OWG) of the General Assembly in July 2014 included a stand-alone goal on education.

Earlier on in the OWG process, there were genuine concerns that education might not emerge as a stand-alone goal, or that there could be a repeat of what happened in 2000 when the scope of the international agenda for education fell short of the ambition and the holistic approach set by the education community.

It was April 2000 when the world gathered in Dakar, Senegal, for the World Education Forum and adopted six Education for All (EFA) goals. It committed United Nations Member States to 1) expand early childhood care and education; 2) universalize primary education; 3) improve access to life-skill learning; 4) achieve 50 per cent improvement in adult literacy; 5) achieve gender equality; and 6) enhance the quality of education. A few months later, eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were established at the United Nations. Featured among the MDGs were universal access to primary education (MDG 2) and a target on gender parity in education, as part of the goal on gender equality and women’s empowerment (MDG 3).

There is now a remarkable opportunity to provide a more aspirational vision for education in the post-2015 development agenda. Preparations began more than two years ago in 2012, when the international education community, co-led by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), began a broad and intensive consultation to define the future education agenda. This extensive process culminated in the Muscat Agreement adopted at the Global EFA Meeting in Oman in May 2014, representing a shared vision of education for the future.

The global education community was reassured that the proposed SDG 4, which calls for the international community to “Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all”, was closely aligned with the proposed goal in the Muscat Agreement. Although there are some discrepancies between the targets in the Muscat Agreement and those proposed by OWG, the seven targets and three means of implementation under SDG 4 set forth an ambitious education agenda that will pave the way for a transformative and sustainable future.

As the specialized agency of the United Nations in education, UNESCO stands by the conviction that education is a fundamental human right inextricably linked to the realization of other rights. As such, it is a public good for all individuals and the foundation for human fulfilment, peace, sustainable development, gender equality and responsible global citizenship. As a catalyst for development, education is a key contributor to reducing inequality and scaling down poverty; and full access to quality education at all levels is an essential condition for accelerating progress towards the achievement of other sustainable development goals. In other words, sustainable development begins with education.

The internationally agreed education goals of EFA and the MDGs have made far-reaching gains over the past 15 years. Countries have used these goals as targets and standards to rally domestic political will to reform and improve their education systems, while donors have used them to align their development aid policies and priorities in education with the international goals and targets.

Since 2000, the international community has made tremendous progress in expanding educational opportunities and has made education and learning a reality for millions of children and adolescents. Despite rapid population growth, the number of primary school age out-of-school children dropped by 42 per cent between 2000 and 2012, with the number for girls seeing an even greater drop of 47 per cent. The number of out-of-school adolescents also reduced by 31 per cent between 1999 and 2011; while during the same period, the pre-primary education gross enrolment ratio increased from 33 to 50 per cent. Among 161 countries with data, the number of countries which achieved gender parity increased from 91 in 1999 to 101 in 2011.

These extraordinary successes demonstrate that achievable and measurable solutions are within reach, to unlock the potential in all learners and to create a prosperous, healthy, just and equitable world. The international community must build on the achievements and lessons learned over the past 15 years, while continuing to identify innovative solutions and approaches to tackle the unfinished business of the Education for All Agenda. For while we have come a long way, there are still an estimated 58 million children who are not going to school and around 100 million children who do not complete primary education. The poor quality of education at the primary level has resulted in some 250 million children leaving school without learning to read, write or count, while an estimated 782 million adults, 64 per cent of whom are women, still lack basic reading and writing skills.

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World Toilet Day November 19 End Open Defecation (EOD) a call to action

Chipata Compound, November 19, Lusaka-Every year on World Toilet Day and beyond, countries worldwide participate in the EOD and bring attention to other sanitary issues in places where there are no toilets or sanitary infrastructure  to use and people end up using the surrounding environment as an alternative. All these can be prevented if the practice of open defecation is stopped through the availability of toilets and other sanitary amenities.

Therefore this observance is a call to action for each and every one of us to break the silence

World Toilet Day November 19 End Open Defecation (EOD) a call to action

Some children reading on the mural signed by others.

with the target of ending the practice by 2025. Zambia is one of many countries in the developing world still grappling with the practice of open defecation in both rural and in high density areas in the cities. Preventable diseases like cholera among others have become perennial due to unhealthy sanitary practices.

However, hope is not lost as the practice of open defecation in communities is slowly being conquered through the support of UNICEF in collaboration with various water utility companies, the Ministry of Local Government and Housing in building toilets in various communities meant to improve the quality of life and reversing the mentioned impacts of open defecation. Some areas that have moved in a positive direction to end open defecation include Choma, Mkushi, Namwala, Monze and other areas in the country.

In Lusaka in some high density areas, the water utility company Lusaka Water and Sewerage Company is rehabilitating the water reticulation system and UNICEF is supporting the building of toilets and water collection points in the community.

On November 19 in Chipata Compound an awareness campaign took place. Drama was the mode of outreach used, the community was taught on the importance and benefits of having a toilet as opposed to using the surroundings sending a clear message that open defecation was a detrimental practice to the general well-being of the people and community.

In random interviews conducted in the community, the people stated that a toilet was a must in any household and brought dignity to its users and encouraged healthy life styles. It also ensured that the environment was kept clean. One area of Chipata compound was a beneficiary to the sanitary facilities built for them and have confirmed that even outbreaks of  water borne  diseases has drastically reduced.