Tag Archives: peace

United Nations in Zambia to Commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Day

PRESS RELEASE

Events to address tolerance, coexistence and peace

The Holocaust Memorial

Lusaka Zambia; From 27 January to 2 February 2017, the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) in Lusaka will hold a series of events to observe the International Remembrance Day of Commemoration in memory of the victims of the Holocaust. The programme will target children and youth in secondary schools and universities in Lusaka, Central and the Copperbelt provinces. Speakers will include UNIC staff, members of the Jewish community in Zambia and Non-Governmental Organizations that work around peace building and friendships.

The United Nations General Assembly, on 1st November 2005, adopted Resolution 60/7 designating 27th January as an Annual International Day of Commemoration in memory of the victims of the Holocaust. The date was chosen to coincide with the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau. The purpose of the Holocaust Memorial Day is to remember and learn from the lessons of the past. The theme for Holocaust remembrance and education activities in 2017 is “Holocaust Remembrance: Educating for a Better Future”.

Approximately six million Jews who were persecuted and murdered by the Nazi regime and its collaborators during the Second World War through a systematic and state-sponsored fashion.

The Holocaust commemoration is important today as it offers lessons of not only the atrocities committed during the First World War but also on the need for tolerance, co-existence, conflict prevention and the respect for human rights. As killings of people in Africa and globally continues to be the order of the day as a result of armed conflict, the Zambian people can learn from these unfortunate events and not take peace for granted. There is need to guard against tribal differences and hate speech as they have the potential to cause conflict.

UNIC Lusaka will during the Holocaust commemorations engage children and youth as they are the future of Zambia who should grow up appreciating the need to defend our common humanity so that they can make correct decisions around peace in future.

The theme for the Holocaust remembrance this year emphasizes the fact that Holocaust education has a universal dimension and can serve as an appropriate platform for building respect for human rights, increasing tolerance and defending our common humanity. The Holocaust was a defining point in history and its lessons have much to teach about the danger of extremism and the prevention of genocide today.

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About UNIC Lusaka:

UNIC provides information services to the public that range from responding to general inquiries about the United Nations to organizing events commemorating special observances. Journalists, researchers, educators, Non-Governmental Organizations and the General Public also rely on UNIC for the lat

est United Nations information. Apart from a library, the centre also has a free internet service that clients can use for online research.

Issued by:

Mark Maseko

National Information Officer

UN Information Centre, Lusaka

Tel: +260-211-228487; Mobile: +260 955 767062; Email: masekom@un.org

Zambia: 22nd Anniversary of the Rwanda Genocide-Film Screening and Exhibition “Fighting the ideology of genocide”

The United Nations Information Centre in Zambia embarked on a 2-day outreach tour of educational institutions in the two provincial towns namely Ndola on the Copperbelt at Ndola National Technical School and Kabwe in Central Province at Kabwe Secondary School from April 6-7, 2016 whose was the theme “Fighting the Ideology of Genocide”.

Students from Kabwe Secondary School (KSS), listening to the presentation

Students from Kabwe Secondary School (KSS), listening to the presentation

The target groups were the students, members of staff and other non-academic staff who were interested in learning and knowing about the Rwanda Genocide. During the tour there was a video screening of documentaries of some survivors and an exhibition, the purpose being to highlight the experiences of what the survivors went through as a way of generating discussions around the theme.

On hand to give background information on the genocide as well as answer questions was Charles Nonde, Team Assistant who coordinated the exhibition, documentaries and the discussion. There was also a screening at UNIC on April 8, 2016.

Discussions from Ndola and Kabwe generated the following questions and opinions:In the documentaries, the survivors mention that some of the perpetrators are still in the community, what sort of punishment has been minted out on the perpetrators?

  1. Why was the UN very slow at putting in place preventative measures to avert the killings, since one of the roles is conflict prevention and peace building?
  2. In Zambia of late there has been a lot intolerance and tribal talk from politicians, who are also using the youth to perpetrate violence against each other. What advice or interventions can the UN in Zambia apply to prevent what happened in Rwanda?
  3. An observation has been made, that in Zambia political leaders are exhibiting dangerous behavior and using language that is inciting violence as evidenced from political meetings, threats on the media and political opponents, there is need to counsel them
    Rwanda Genocide memorial

    Passersby viewing the Rwanda Genocide Panels

    and show them documentaries such as those of the survivors so that they don’t encourage violent acts towards others.

  4. Some students after the presentation were of the view that forgiveness and the process of healing for them would be applicable only if they would also inflict some form of hurt on the perpetrators so that they too feel the pain and annoy of losing loved ones to a senseless cause.

Other activities included; Exhibition, outreach through bulk sms (30, 000), video screening and public outreach (1000 students) and media interview with the Post Newspapers (300,000 readers)

 

 

Seventy Years of the United Nations

Article by the late former Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, published in the UN Chronicle special double issue in 2015 celebrating the 70th anniversary of the establishment of the United Nations. It is one of the last articles former Secretary-General Boutros-Ghali wrote. In it, he reflected upon the future and what would make the Organization stronger and better able to serve humanity.

By Boutros Boutros-Ghali

To highlight the achievements of the United Nations in the past 70 years would fill many volumes, and I’m afraid that writing about my wishes for the United Nations in the next seven decades would fill even more books.

Boutros Boutros-Ghali is former Secretary-General of the United Nations, having served from January 1992 to December 1996.

Boutros Boutros-Ghali is former Secretary-General of the United Nations,
having served from January 1992 to December 1996.

But perhaps two moments stand out in the proud history of our Organization: the first is the invention of peacekeeping that allowed the United Nations to truly foster world peace through a mechanism we take for granted today, but which is unique in the history of international relations.

When I became Secretary-General, the first-ever summit meeting of Heads of State and Government of the Security Council took place, and their mandate to me was clear: develop the next generation of peacekeeping operations. Out of that mandate came An Agenda for Peace. I wish we still heeded the messages of that proposal.

Another great moment for the United Nations was the declaration of human rights, at the start of our Organization’s history, and the World Conference on Human Rights held at Vienna in 1993. There have been many conferences setting world agendas and goals before and after Vienna, but for the world to come together to define human rights, and to state clearly a global commitment to their achievement, was an important moment in history.

So what do I wish for the future? My wish is that we build on past achievements and update them for the modern world. Just as the United Nations invented peacekeeping, we now need to modernize the practice, and the Security Council’s use of the instruments at its disposal to promote international peace and security. We need a new Agenda for Peace.

We also need to build on the tremendous movement for human rights, and to help ensure that they are universally adopted. It took the same courage to state the universality of these principles in the Declaration and in Vienna, and apply it to the new attacks on the most basic human right: the right to life. Furthermore, we need courage and vision to reach a global consensus in an agreement on defining the scourge of terrorism, and a strong global commitment to fighting this evil.

I am confident that the United Nations, our United Nations, will continue to lead in innovation so that we reach the aim of the Charter for life “in larger freedom”.

Boutros Boutros-Ghali is former Secretary-General of the United Nations,

having served from January 1992 to December 1996.

 

The United Nations in Zambia receive a new UN Resident Coordinator, Ms. Janet Rogan

UN Resident Coordinator submitting credentials to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

The United Nations Resident Coordinator in Zambia, Ms Janet Rogan, yesterday presented her credentials to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Hon Mr Harry Kalaba MP.

During a brief ceremony held at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ms Rogan commended Zambia for its exemplary role in the family of nations, fully in the spirit of the words of the UN Charter, promoting unity among all Zambians and living in peace over the fifty years since the country joined the United Nations as an independent state. “You (Zambia) have long been, and continue to be, a generous haven for those fleeing violent conflict.  You are now taking an innovative and people-centred approach to the sustainable integration of former refugees in Zambia, which may serve as a shining example to others,” said Ms Rogan.

Ms. Rogan congratulated Zambia on assuming Chairmanship of the United Nations Land Locked Developing Countries group.  She applauded the key role Zambia has played to date in the Post-2015 Dialogue, leading debate on the future direction of Sustainable Development and pressing globally for a bold and inspiring Post-2015 Development Agenda aimed at achieving fair socio-economic development, promoting democracy and protecting and preserving the rights of all people.  She reaffirmed the UN’s commitment to support Zambia’s own sustainable development priorities, including reducing poverty, equitable access to health and other services, and respect for the rule of law and human rights according to the Universal Declaration.  She expressed her personal commitment to supporting Zambia’s aims for women and youth, particularly the girl child and adolescents.