Tag Archives: partnerships

The Sustainable Development Goals: a learning process for private sector, local authorities, the youth and Librarians in the country.

The United Nations Youth Association of Zambia, Chingola Chapter organized a series of discussions on the SDGs with focus on Goal 11 Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable in Chingola, while the other was organized through the Library Association of Zambia (LIAZ). These discussions took place from June 18 through July 21, 2016 at Icon Hotel in Chingola and Fatmols Executive Lodge in Ndola respectively.

The SDGs

The SDGs

The first discussion had youths from different backgrounds in attendance, including students at tertiary level and those in both formal and informal business. During this session they were given a general overview of the SDGs and specific information on goal 11 and its impact on the city of Chingola was given by Charles Nonde, Team Assistant UNIC Lusaka.

Mr, Zulu, Director of Planning at the Chingola City Council, shared some insight in the practical things that the council is doing in realizing SDG 11. He said that the council has partnered with UNEP and will be constructing an energy efficient and sustainable building in the centre of Chingola that will act as a show piece and example for promoting modern day buildings that are also sustainable. He also explained that the council was in the process of obtaining solar street lights and have them installed in various locations of the city as a way of averting the current power deficit being faced countrywide.

Mr. Sakala a private sector ICT entrepreneur who runs an entity called Net Innovation Enterprise in Chingola gave a presentation on how they are incorporating the SDGs as part of their operating strategy and promoting good sustainable business practices.

The Library Association of Zambia (LIAZ) holds its annual general conference in July, this year it was from 19th to 21st July 2016, and extended an invitation to the centre to present on the SDGs and how Librarians and other information professionals can help achieve them through their various channels. A presentation was done by Charles Nonde, Team Assistant together with the LIAZ President Mrs. Velenasi Munsanje. The conference with attended by 80 librarians from different institutions countrywide, encompassing academic and professional bodies.

Information professionals were reminded that libraries make an important contribution to development, it was also highlighted that economic development can be broadened so that it now involves not only the reduction in poverty, inequality and unemployment but also to an improvement in the quality of life which includes a cleaner environment, better education, good health and nutrition.

In our knowledge society, libraries provide access and opportunity for all. Libraries guarantee access to information, a cross-cutting target that supports all SDGs said the LIAZ President.

While SDGs are universal goals, each country is responsible for developing and implementing national strategies in order to achieve them. The relevance of libraries and other specialized units is key to creating awareness and promoting the SDGs by aligning themselves to the specifics of the SDGs.

Mr. Nonde, emphasized that libraries have the responsibility of transforming our world
increasing access to information and knowledge across the society, assisted by the availability of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), supports sustainable development and improves people’s lives

UN Resident Coordinator Janet Rogan tours the Copperbelt: Economic Development and the SDGs

The UN Resident Coordinator in Zambia, Ms. Janet Rogan undertook a one-week tour of the Copperbelt from June 27 to June 30, 2016. During this time, she visited a number of private sector entities in the mining industry at small to large scale from Lufwanyama to Chililabombwe in order to better understand their business models and the various partnerships if any that exist and how they fit into the development agenda of the country and the SDGs. She also visited one of the largest beef producing farms in the country Zambeef located in Mpongwe district, Copperbelt.

Monday June 27

There were two visits to the Provincial Administration; courtesy calls to the Permanent Secretary Rev. Howard J Sikwela and the Commissioner of Police Ms. Charity Katanga

After the visits in Ndola, the mission went to Mpongwe and visited the Mpongwe Agriculture Development Corporation being managed by Zambeef Zambia limited. During the visit, the team was met by Ms. Brenda Lombard who is the Commercial manager. Ms. Lombard gave an outline of the operations of Zambeef and its expansion program in the chicken production unit, where it has plans to supply an average of 300,000 chicks every week. The expansion will create at least 3000 jobs for the locals and ready market for maize for the small scale farmers in and around Mpongwe, as Zambeef would require an average 30,000 tons of maize for stock feed production on a monthly basis.

The mission also visited one of the clinics and school that Zambeef supports. At the school the Ms. Rogan took time to engage with the pupils and discussed the role of the UN in development activities. She encouraged the girl child on the importance of getting an education with the message “school first and babies later”. She also shared the information with the pupils the work of the UN and this was appreciated as there was little knowledge on the subject matter. At the clinic she was given a tour of the facility and the services they provide including provision of ART and management of medical waste. On medical waste management the mission engaged the health staff to explore modern and efficient technologies of waste management that do not only contribute to environmental protection but also mitigate climate change such as autoclave.
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Tuesday June 28

UN Resident Coordinator, Janet Rogan Entourage touring Lufwanyama at Dambisa Mine

UN Resident Coordinator, Janet Rogan Entourage touring Lufwanyama at Dambisa Mine

The day begun with an inception meeting with the Executive Team of the Emerald Mining Association of Zambia in Kitwe. The president of the association gave a brief history of the mining operations on the Copperbelt and that of the Association highlighting the following:
• The need for capacity building to support the small scale miners
• Access to long term financing
• Need to help miners with skills development
• Support towards linkages to big players in the industry

While in Lufwanyama The RC’s entourage visited two small scale emerald mining sites (one operational, the other not) and a large scale mine owned and operated by Gemcanton.

i. The first site visited is owned by Ms. Violet Lewis and at the time of the visit, no mining activities were ongoing as it was flooded which is one of the challenges faced by small mining operations. The flooding occurs due to lack of equipment for pumping water.
ii. The second site visited was at Dabwisa Small Scale Mining Operation owned and managed by Mr. Malan Ngwira, a retired teacher. Despite being small scale, the local investor has mobilized heavy duty machinery to help in the mining of the emeralds. It was also observed that the work force had the appropriate protective gear to enable them work in the hazardous environment.

iii. Visit to Gemcanton/Grizzly Large Scale Emerald Mining: The visit begun with an induction from mine management at which they explained the investment portfolio of the mine. Key lesson at this mine was the deliberate effort to retool local uneducated staff in some of the

Snap shoot of the open pit mine at Gemcanton mine lufwanyama

Snap shoot of the open pit mine at Gemcanton mine lufwanyama

company’s mining chains. Local staff are being recruited to work as sorters, welders, miners and machine operators. After a period of 6 months, the recruited staff are awarded certificates which will enable them to get employed in any mine. The company is also supporting adult evening classes for those who want to learn English. From the time the company took over the operations of the mine in 2015, they have managed to increase the workforce from 300 to 700.

The team was then taken on a tour of the mining operations on site that included the open pit mine, the washer and sorting areas.

Gemcanton Management also reaffirmed its commitment to support other mining operations in the area and exploring possible partnerships with small scale miners especially in helping to negotiate better prices as they have global links with key players in the sector. They requested the UN to continue supporting the policy framework that would enable them to operate effectively. The issue of electricity supply was cited as a key challenge that the sector is facing. Furthermore, there is need for government to develop infrastructure such as roads to support the sector.

Wednesday June 29

Visit to Konkola Copper Mines, Chililabombwe and Nchanga

One of the anode making sections at Nchanga Mine in Chingola

One of the anode making sections at Nchanga Mine in Chingola

After meeting management at the headquarters of KCM, the team was taken on a tour of the underground mining operations in Chililabombwe and operations at Nchanga, Chingola and shown the process of how the copper anodes are produced.

Thursday June 30

Private Partnership meeting Mukuba Hotel, Ndola

Private Partnership meeting Mukuba Hotel, Ndola

Private Sector dialogue at Mukuba hotel, the RC delivered a speech at this forum and also gave an exclusive interview to the media houses present on the side lines of the dialogue. Among the issues she spoke on included the referendum, the bill of rights and its meaning to the people of Zambia.

The RC lead the discussion and advocacy on how the private sector could be part of the global development agenda through the UN led concepts on Business Call to Action and the Global Compact
Ndola Energy Limited (NEL) – Power producer (50 MW) from heavy fuels

After the the private sector dialogue meeting in the morning, the RC Team visited Ndola Energy, the team was oriented in the inner working of the plant and given a safety talk before being taken around the plant. The visitors learnt that NEL sells its power to ZESCO and depends on Indeni for its raw materials FCO that it uses in the production of electricity. The purpose of the visits was to engage with different players in the energy sector on how they can contribute towards the attainment of SDG 7, Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all and also contribute to the country’s energy mix

Friday July 1

Visit to Kitwe- Zambia Homeless and Poor People’s Federation

RC meeting with the women's group in kitwe

UN Resident Coordinator meeting with the women’s group in kitwe

The purpose of this visit was to showcase some of the women who have not only benefitted from housing units but also skills that they have obtained in assembling solar panels and installing them. The women’s group also makes its own bricks which it uses to construct houses in the area. Of the 150 plots given 100 of them have fully constructed units or are in various stages of completion.

Ms. Bupe the coordinator of the Federation explained that the financial support that the women received for raw materials was in the form of a loan that acted as revolving fund to help those in need of assistance.

One of the women took the team around her house and explained how she was able to design and install an electrical system for the solar panel, she also explained that she earns some extra income from the skills she obtained in assembling and installing solar systems within the neighborhood and beyond. RC congratulated the women for commitment and advised them to transform the initiative into a business.

The UN in Zambia holds Discussion Forums and road shows on the Post-2015 Development Agenda June 22- June 28, 2014

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) addressed the fact that not enough recognition had been given to some of the world’s main development challenges: poverty reduction, education,

Outreach through edutainment.

Outreach through edutainment.

maternal health, gender equality, child mortality, HIV/AIDS and other diseases. The MDGs were instrumental in mobilizing the international development community around simple, clear and measurable goals. Shortfalls however, have occurred not because the MDGs are unreachable, or because time is too short, but due to unmet commitments, inadequate resources and a lack of focus and accountability. Now with a fast-approaching deadline to achieve MDGs by 2015, a strong consensus is now emerging on the need for a bold and inspiring ‘Post-2015 Development Agenda’ that is measurable in both theory and practice, for effective implementation, monitoring and accountability of development delivery.

The first round of the global consultations in 2013, including in Zambia, were focused on the issues to be included in the Post 2015 Agenda, hence addressed the “what”. The dialogue organized under the auspices of the UN Country Team, ensured an active engagement of the government representatives, policy makers, Civil Society Organizations (CSOs), and young people across Zambia, with results which put Quality Education as the number one priority. This outcome saw the education sector get a boost in budget for 2014, and also guided the Zambia’s Ministry of Finance (MoF) to form a task-team to work further on preparing the country’s vision/position on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The task-team comprises the Government of Republic of Zambia, private sector, civil society and the UN. Globally, the national consultations provided substantive inputs to the Post-2015 processes, influencing key reports such as the SG’s High Level Panel on Post-2015 and the SG’s report on the MDGs and the Post-2015 Agenda: A Life of Dignity for All.

The initiative is now in its second round, focusing more on concrete ways of making the Post 2015 Agenda a reality by addressing the “How”. Continuing an inclusive dialogue on Post-2015 is an appeal by many young Zambians, who expressed a strong desire for continued avenues for consultation and engagement. It is also the mandate given to the UN by Member States; the Outcome Document of the UNGA68 Special Event on the MDGs and Post-2015 states: “In arriving at an inclusive and people-centered Post-2015 Development Agenda, we look forward to a transparent intergovernmental process which will include inputs from all stakeholders including civil society, scientific and knowledge institutions, parliaments, local authorities, and the private sector as governments count on the strong support of the UN system throughout all of its work.

The United Nations in Zambia conducted a district wide consultative dialogue program on the Post 2015 Development agenda from June 22, 2014 to June 28, 2014. Under the roadshows and the dialogues 5000 people from different representations took part in the Participatory, Monitoring and Accountability dialogues which included Civil society groups, senior government officers, high schools and communities in Kitwe, Ndola and Kabwe

These meeting are in line with the first round of consultation on post-2015 Agenda undertaken last year which focused on the issues to be included in the post-2015 agenda highlighting the need for better health facilities, more employment opportunities , a more responsive and caring government among other issues hence it addressed the ‘what’.
However, the second round of discussion was focused more on concrete ways of making the post-2015 Agenda a reality by addressing the ‘How’, therefore through the discussions with the different stakeholders answers would be provided. The groups answered a set of questions as a way of trying to find out their level of participation in the development agenda, it was discovered that many of the people are never consulted in the development agenda as a result felt left out, this in the process made it difficult for them monitor and make their leaders accountable with the various resources entrusted to them.

In the discussion with CSOs many issues emerged they alluded to the fact that they knew about the existence of development plans, but they never got involved in the process this made it difficult for them to participate in monitoring all developmental projects and plans. They also lacked information on development plans and projects and therefore, they could not give feedback to the government. They reiterated that there was need by the government to involve the civil society development plans and to engage participatory governance. A bottom up kind of flow of information would motivate people’s participation in local debate and this would provide effective monitoring and accountability.

Regarding the Millennium Development Goals, most of the youth talked to were unfamiliar with the MDGs and their wider implications in national development. Most young people think the MDGs are for the United Nations and the government and by extension didn’t know who is responsible for achieving the MDGs. The youth pointed out that Government should therefore create a platform for consultation on developmental issues among the youth in order for them to be actively involved in molding the future because participatory monitoring and accountability is the only tool that is able to push for policy change in the way implementation of developmental projects are done.

The parliamentarians and councilors during their own deliberations, said although they were aware of the district plans they did not know them and were not actively involved in the process of planning, other than the implementation stage. They agreed that information should be made available to all stakeholders to foster development; the availability of information enables the stakeholders and key policy makers to give necessary feedback on the matters of development and the plans for development.

In order to achieve the ‘How’ of the post -2015 agenda, the challenges that are being faced should be resolved. All stakeholders should be actively involved the development planning as well as the developmental projects and should not see the Post-2015 Agenda as independent of their core business but must be their core business; young people should change their views and start seeing themselves as changers and key contributors to national development. There must be available data on MDGs as well as the Post-2015 Agenda readily available for all and all stakeholders must be well educated on the matter at hand in order for them the participatory monitoring and accountability to work. It is widely acknowledged that participatory, monitoring and accountability can bring a comparative advantage in undertaking developmental projects relating to providing inclusive and transparent practices which will change habits and promote monitoring of developmental projects.