Author Archives: Charles Nonde

About Charles Nonde

Team Assistant at UN Information Centre, Lusaka Zambia.

70 years of the Genocide Convention – demonstrating our commitment to the promise of “never again”

By Adama Dieng, United Nations Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide

This year we will commemorate the seventieth anniversary of the Convention on the Prevention

Mr. Adama Dieng, United Nations Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide.

Mr. Adama Dieng, United Nations Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide.

and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (the Genocide Convention). The Genocide Convention was the first human rights treaty to be adopted by the United Nations General Assembly, on 9 December 1948, just three years after the birth of the United Nations. Its adoption was largely the result of the tireless efforts of one man, Raphael Lemkin who, after losing most of his family in the Holocaust, was determined to do what he could to make sure that this crime could never happen again. Some six million Jews were murdered in the Holocaust, one of the most devastating human tragedies of the twentieth century, as well as many others whom the Nazis considered “undesirable”. The Genocide Convention represents the United Nations commitment to the often quoted “never again”; a commitment to learn from and not repeat history.

Regrettably, this commitment has often failed to translate into action, even when it has been most needed. We saw this in 1994 in the abject failure of the international community to prevent the genocide of the Tutsis in Rwanda, which cost the lives of almost a million people in the space of 100 days. No more than a year later, we witnessed it again as the international community, including United Nations peacekeepers, looked away during the Srebrenica genocide in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Important progress has been made since – and because of – these failures. In 1998, the International Criminal Court was established, a permanent court already foreseen by the Genocide Convention in 1948. In 2005, the Secretary-General established the post of Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, a position I currently hold, to ensure that there is a voice within the United Nations system that can alert the Secretary-General and, through him, the Security Council, to early warning signs of genocide and advocate for preventative action before genocide becomes a reality.

In addition, at the 2005 World Summit all United Nations Member States made a ground-breaking commitment to protect their populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity (atrocity crimes) and to take collective action when States manifestly fail to do so, in accordance with and using the tools provided by the United Nations Charter. This has become known as the principle of “the responsibility to protect”

Despite these achievements and the continued commitment to “never again”, we have not managed to eradicate genocide. International crimes, including genocide, are a terrible reality faced by populations across the globe. We know the warning signs and we know how to prevent these crimes, but we often fail to act in time, or to act at all. In the Central African Republic, Iraq, Myanmar, South Sudan, Syria and in so many other places, people are being targeted because of their identity – because of the religion they practice, the culture in which they were raised or simply because of their distinctive physical characteristics. This is unacceptable.

We also fail to invest sufficiently in prevention, to build the resilience needed to address the risk factors for genocide, or to take timely and decisive action when we see the warning signs.

Our commitment to the Genocide Convention must be reinvigorated. The fact that we have not eradicated genocide is not because the Convention is flawed, but rather because its potential has not been fully realised. And despite universal rejection of genocide, some Member States have still not taken the fundamental step of ratifying the Convention.

At the time of writing, 145 States have ratified the Genocide Convention. Surprisingly, 45 United Nations Member States have not yet done so. Of these 20 are in Africa, 18 in Asia and seven in Latin America.

Universal ratification of the Convention is fundamental to demonstrate that genocide has no place in our world. That no one should fear discrimination, persecution or violence simply because of who they are.

What message are the States who have not ratified the Convention sending, 70 years after its adoption? That genocide could never happen within their borders? Genocide can happen anywhere. History has shown us time and again that no region or country is immune. Yet many States seem reluctant to even consider this a possibility or to undertake a critical evaluation of their risks and vulnerabilities.

In December last year, I launched an appeal for universal ratification of the Genocide Convention, urging the 45 United Nations Member States that have not done so to take steps to ratify or accede to the Convention before its 70th anniversary on 9 December 2018. The aim of this appeal is to refocus our attention on the Convention, underline its continued importance as the legal standard for ensuring the punishment of this crime, as well as its often-untapped potential as a tool for prevention.

The Genocide Convention, together with its sister treaties on human rights and the Rome statute for the International Criminal Court, remains the most important legal standard we have to fulfil the commitment to “never again” that the world made 70 years ago. For our own sakes, and for the sake of future generations: #PreventGenocide.

 

To learn more about the Convention and how you can support the appeal click here

To learn more about the Special Adviser and the work of his office click here

Experts define sustainable packaging priorities for Africa Efficient packaging systems reduce food losses, scale up trade

On 10 September 2018, the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and the International

Participants of the food packaging meeting. Photo/UNIC/Lusaka/Maseko/2018

Participants of the food packaging meeting. Photo/UNIC/Lusaka/Maseko/2018

Trade Centre (ITC) held a regional packaging meeting in Lusaka as prelude to the World Export Development Forum (WEDF) that Zambia hosted from 11 – 13 September 2018. Food losses and waste are an enormous drain on natural resources. The meeting was held against a backdrop of statistics that indicate about one-third of the annual food produced globally for human consumption (approximately 1.3 billion tonnes) being lost or wasted. These losses are particularly unfortunate in Africa where approximately 20 percent of the population is undernourished.

Appropriate packaging has a significant impact in improving food quality and safety, thereby reducing food losses, whilst enhancing the competitiveness of Africa’s agro-enterprises and boosting trade. Furthermore, packaging plays a key role in improving the marketing of produce and is an important part of a strategy to enhance competitiveness of small and medium agro-enterprises (SMAEs).

Better packaging, traceability and labeling is necessary to enhance the quality and safety of products, noted Hon. Christopher Yaluma (MP), Zambia’s Minister of Commerce, Trade and Industry, in a speech read on his behalf by the ministry’s Director for Foreign Trade, Lillian Bwalya,. “New entrepreneurs want to grow businesses that are both profitable and sustainable, reflecting the aspirations of their customers in Africa as well as buyers throughout the world,” he added.

Mitigating packaging constraints

Through a project implemented by FAO and ITC and funded by Industria Macchine Automatiche, industry packaging leaders and experts from several sub-Saharan African countries have come together to make recommendations on how to scale up packaging solutions for the agri-food sector.

Among the significant bottlenecks associated with packaging, African firms and packaging experts cited the lack and high cost of packaging equipment and materials. The also noted the high maintenance and servicing costs, absence of advice to source inputs among others. These challenges were hindering the value chain development and the SMAEs effort to generate income.

George Okech, FAO Representative in Zambia, noted that poor packaging is one of the key constraints facing small and medium agro-enterprises, who in aggregate manufacture the bulk of locally processed food products on the continent. “Improving packaging systems will contribute to strengthening the entire food supply chain, improve the competitiveness of these enterprises and benefit all food chain actors and consumers,” he said.

Among proposed solutions are options for shared service centers; quality management and branding training for small firms; access to relevant digital printing technologies; and access to packaging-related market information.

Reducing the environmental impact

To reducing the overall environmental impact of food packaging systems, the continent should also take into account the environmental impact of the packaging material itself.

The ITC Deputy Executive Director, Dorothy Tembo, noted that packaging is recently hitting the headlines for the wrong reasons. Its contribution to pollution was leading to very negative consumer reactions, particularly to single-use, non-recyclable plastics.

“Production lines can be adapted at minimal cost to reduce waste, pollution and your carbon footprint, whilst improving overall profitability and the attractiveness of your products. African Enterprises must lead in green packaging for Africa to keep its natural environment whilst bolstering opportunities for its people”, she said.

The workshop recommended the urgent need for; facilities to test new packaging designs, information platforms to inform processors about available materials and equipment, and advisory support services to help enterprises adapt production and product design to reduce costs, waste and pollution. Also, the meeting advocated for the need to attract investors to develop scalable and recyclable packaging manufacturing facilities.

UN mourns death of former Secretary-General Kofi Annan, ‘a guiding force for good’

Mr. Annan was the seventh man to take the helm of the global organization and the first Secretary-General to emerge from the ranks of its staff.

The current UN chief, Antonio Guterres hailed him as “a guiding force for good” and a “proud son of Africa who became a global champion for peace and all humanity.”

“Like so many, I was proud to call Kofi Annan a good friend and mentor. I was deeply honoured

Kofi Annan, Former UN Secretary General 1997-2006

Kofi Annan, Former UN Secretary General 1997-2006

by his trust in selecting me to serve as UN High Commissioner for Refugees under his leadership. He remained someone I could always turn to for counsel and wisdom — and I know I was not alone,” Mr. Guterres said in a statement.

“He provided people everywhere with a space for dialogue, a place for problem-solving and a path to a better world.  In these turbulent and trying times, he never stopped working to give life to the values of the United Nations Charter. His legacy will remain a true inspiration for all us.”

Kofi Annan was born in Kumasi, Ghana, on 8 April 1938.

He served as UN Secretary-General for two consecutive five-year terms, beginning in January 1997.

Mr. Annan joined the UN system in 1962 as an administrative and budget officer with the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva, rising to hold senior-level posts in areas such as budget and finance, and peacekeeping.

As Mr. Guterres noted: “In many ways, Kofi Annan was the United Nations. He rose through the ranks to lead the organization into the new millennium with matchless dignity and determination.”

From his beginnings in Geneva, Mr. Annan held UN posts in places such as Ethiopia, Egypt, the former Yugoslavia and at Headquarters in New York.

Following Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait in 1990, he was tasked with facilitating the repatriation of more than 900 international staff as well as the release of Western hostages.

He later led the first UN team negotiating with Iraq on the sale of oil to fund purchases of humanitarian aid.

Immediately prior to his appointment as Secretary-General in January 1997, Mr. Annan headed the UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations during a period which saw an unprecedented growth in the Organization’s field presence.

His first major initiative as UN chief was a plan for UN reform, presented to Member States in July 1997.

Mr. Annan used his office to advocate for human rights, the rule of law, development and Africa, and he worked to bring the UN closer to people worldwide by forging ties with civil society, the private sector and other partners.

As Secretary-General, he also galvanized global action to fight HIV/AIDS and combat terrorism.

Mr. Annan and the United Nations jointly were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2001.

In his farewell statement to the UN General Assembly in December 2006, Kofi Annan expressed emotion over leaving what he called “this mountain with its bracing winds and global views.”

Although the job had been difficult and challenging, he admitted that it was also “thrillingly rewarding” at times.

“And while I look forward to resting my shoulder from those stubborn rocks in the next phase of my life, I know I shall miss the mountain,” he said.

However, Mr. Annan did not rest, taking on the role of UN Special Envoy for Syria in the wake of the conflict which began in March 2011.

He also chaired an Advisory Commission established by Myanmar in 2016 to improve the welfare of all people in Rakhine state, home to the minority Rohingya community.

His homeland, Ghana, established an international peacekeeping training centre that bears his name, which was commissioned in 2004.

Source: UN News 

Statement by the Secretary-General on the passing of former Secretary-General Kofi Annan

Kofi Annan was a guiding force for good.  It is with profound sadness that I learned of his

Kofi Annan, Former UN Secretary General  1997-2006

Kofi Annan, Former UN Secretary General 1997-2006

passing.  In many ways, Kofi Annan was the United Nations. He rose through the ranks to lead the organization into the new millennium with matchless dignity and determination.

Like so many, I was proud to call Kofi Annan a good friend and mentor. I was deeply honoured by his trust in selecting me to serve as UN High Commissioner for Refugees under his leadership. He remained someone I could always turn to for counsel and wisdom — and I know I was not alone. He provided people everywhere with a space for dialogue, a place for problem-solving and a path to a better world.  In these turbulent and trying times, he never stopped working to give life to the values of the United Nations Charter. His legacy will remain a true inspiration for all of us.

My heartfelt condolences to Nane Annan, their beloved family, and all who mourn the loss of this proud son of Africa who became a global champion for peace and all humanity.

French Version

Kofi Annan était une force directrice pour le bien. C’est avec une profonde tristesse que j’ai appris son décès. À bien des égards, Kofi Annan était l’Organisation des Nations Unies. Il a gravi les échelons pour mener l’Organisation dans le nouveau millénaire avec une dignité et une détermination sans pareil.

Comme beaucoup d’autres, j’étais fier d’appeler Kofi Annan mon ami et mentor. J’ai été profondément honoré de sa confiance quand il m’a choisi comme Haut-Commissaire des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés sous sa direction.

Il est resté quelqu’un à qui je pouvais toujours demander conseil et qui savait partager sa sagesse – et je sais que je n’étais pas seul. Il a fourni aux gens du monde entier un espace de dialogue, un lieu de résolution de problèmes et un chemin vers un monde meilleur. En ces temps difficiles et turbulents, il n’a jamais cessé de travailler pour donner vie aux valeurs de la Charte des Nations Unies. Son héritage restera une véritable inspiration pour nous tous.

Mes sincères condoléances à Nane Annan, leur famille bien-aimée, et à tous ceux qui pleurent la perte de ce fier fils d’Afrique qui est devenu un champion mondial de la paix et de l’humanité tout entière.

New York, 18 août 2018

Taking action where we can to stop Cybercrime

By Yury Fedotov

The author is the Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. The op-ed is on the need for cooperation to tackle cybercrime.

Cyber. It is the inescapable prefix defining our world today. From the privacy of individuals to relations between states, cyber dominates discussions and headlines – so much so that we risk being paralyzed by the magnitude of the problems we face.

Yury Fedotov, Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.

Yury Fedotov, Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.

But we would do well to keep in mind that despite the many outstanding questions on the future of cybersecurity and governance, international cooperation is essential to tackle the ever-growing threats of cybercrime.

Online exploitation and abuse of children. Darknet markets for illicit drugs and firearms. Ransomware attacks. Human traffickers using social media to lure victims. Cybercrime’s unprecedented reach – across all borders, into our homes and schools, businesses, hospitals and other vital service providers – only amplifies the threats.

A recent estimate put the global cost of cybercrime at 600 billion US dollars. The damage done to sustainable development and safety, to gender equality and protection –women and girls are disproportionately harmed by online sexual abuse – is immense.

Keeping people safer online is an enormous task and no one entity or government has the perfect solution. But there is much we can do, and need to do more of, to strengthen prevention and improve responses to cybercrime, namely:

  • Build up capabilities, most of all law enforcement, to shore up gaps, particularly in developing countries; and
  • Strengthen international cooperation and dialogue – between governments, the United Nations, other international as well as regional organizations, INTERPOL and the many other partners, including business and civil society, with a stake in stopping cybercrime.

Cyber-dependent crime, including malware proliferation, ransomware and hacking; cyber-enabled crime, for example email phishing to steal financial data; and online child sexual exploitation and abuse all have something in common besides the “cyber” aspect: they are crimes.

Police, prosecutors and judges need to understand these crimes, they need the tools to investigate and go after the criminals and protect the victims, and they need to be able to prosecute and adjudicate cases.

At the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), we are working in more than 50 countries to provide the necessary training, to sharpen investigative skills, trace cryptocurrencies as part of financial investigations, and use software to detect online abuse materials and go after predators.

As a direct result of our capacity-building efforts in one country, a high-risk paedophile with over 80 victims –– was arrested, tried and convicted. We delivered the training in partnership with the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children and Facebook. This is just one example of how capacity building and partnerships with NGOs and the private sector can ensure that criminals are behind bars and vulnerable children protected.

Working with the Internet Watch Foundation, we have launched child sexual abuse reporting portals – most recently in Belize – so that citizens can take the initiative to report abuse images and protect girls and boys from online exploitation.

With partners including Thorn and Pantallas Amigas we are strengthening online protection and educating parents, caregivers and children about cyber risks through outreach in schools and local communities. Prevention is the key.

UNODC training – focused primarily on Central America, the Middle East and North Africa, Eastern Africa and South East Asia – is also helping to identify digital evidence in online drug trafficking, confront the use of the darknet for criminal and terrorist purposes, and improve data collection to better address threats.

A critical foundation for all our efforts is international cooperation. Our work – which is entirely funded by donor governments – has shown that despite political differences, countries can and do come together to counter the threats of cybercrime.

We are also strengthening international cooperation through the Intergovernmental Expert Group, which meets at UNODC headquarters in Vienna.

Established by General Assembly resolution, the Expert Group brings together diplomats, policy makers and experts from around the globe to discuss the most pressing challenges in cybercrime today. These meetings demonstrate the desire and willingness of governments to pursue pragmatic cooperation, which can only help to improve prevention and foster trust.

As a next step, we need to reinforce these efforts, including by providing more resources to support developing countries, which often have the most new Internet users and the weakest defences against cybercrime.

Tech companies are an indispensable ally in the fight against cybercrime. We need to increase public-private sector engagement to address common concerns like improving education and clamping down on online abuse material.

Countering cybercrime can save lives, grow prosperity and build peace. By strengthening law enforcement capacities and partnering with businesses so they can be part of the solution, we can go a long way in ensuring that the Internet can be a force for good.

Public discussion on Peacekeeping documentary “Until There is Peace”

More than 60 guests attended the documentary screening of the “Until there is Peace” movie, which was held on 18 April 2018 at UNIC Lusaka.

The movie screening attracted guests from the Zambia Scouts Association, students from the

Patrons watching the documentary "Until There is Peace"

Patrons watching the documentary “Until There is Peace”

University of Zambia (UNZA), Zambia Institute of Chartered Accountants (ZICA), Evelyn Hone College of Applied Arts and Commerce, as well as UNIC Lusaka Library dairy clients among others.

Until there is peace, is a movie that was directed by Melonie Kastman and produced by Lynn Zekanis. The documentary aims to show the important role that UN Peacekeeping missions play to foster peace with a particular highlight of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

The one hour thirty-five minutes documentary had the guests glued with silence as they watched, and later had a very educative and interactive question and answer session which resulted in UNIC Lusaka staff explaining more about the works of the UN Peacekeepers as most of the guests only after watching the movie did they appreciate the efforts of the peacekeepers.

Meanwhile, Colonel Rex Mwenda a member of the Zambia Scouts Association emphasised that UNIC Lusaka needs to host more of such events, so that many Zambians can see and commend the UN Peacekeepers for the job well done in filling up the loopholes in war torn countries to eradicate conflict.

More information on United Nations Peacekeeping Operations

The Commemoration of The International Day of Reflection on the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda

On April 6 and April 7 2018 UNIC Lusaka successfully organized two school outreach activities at Ndola Girls Technical Secondary School and St Paul’s Boys Secondary School in the Copperbelt and Central provinces

Pupils at Ndola Girls Technical Secondary School viewing the poster exhibition.

Pupils at Ndola Girls Technical Secondary School viewing the poster exhibition.

respectively, in commemoration of The International Day of Reflection on the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda. 2018 makes it exactly Twenty-four years ago, when more than 800,000 people were systematically killed in the 1994 genocide in Rwanda.

More than 550 students from Ndola Girls Technical Secondary School and St Paul’s Boys Secondary School participated in the activities which were held from 6 – 7 April 2018. At both schools, apart from offering a brief history on the genocide, UNIC Lusaka staff also showed two videos, a short film documentary titled ‘Kwibuka’ and another video of testimonies by survivors of the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda.

The videos later moderated a heated and enlightening discussion with the participants who passionately talked about the effects of genocide on society and the need to preserve peace

Martin Siame a pupil from St Paul’s Secondary School asking a question on what the United Nations was doing when people were being killed in Rwanda and what role they played in ending the civil war during the question and answer session.

Martin Siame a pupil from St Paul’s Secondary School asking a question on what the United Nations was doing when people were being killed in Rwanda and what role they played in ending the civil war during the question and answer session.

through co-existence among tribal groupings, tolerance, respect for human rights and continued awareness creation among the public.

The programme also had a question and answer session through which UNIC Lusaka clarified a lot of issues on the role of the United Nations in peace and security and advised everyone to learn from the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda tragedy.

Participants also further urged UNIC Lusaka to continue sensitizing children and the youths as they were the future and are in need of such information so that such atrocities and crimes against humanity never occur again.

Observance of the Transatlantic Slave Trade and Remember Slavery

The United Nations Information Centre in Zambia undertook two school outreach activities in

Students from Chibombo Boarding School watch the documentary “Familiar Faces/Unexpected Places: A Global African Diaspora”

commemoration of the Transatlantic Slave Trade and Remember Slavery, reaching about 900 students. The activities were conducted at Chibombo Secondary School and Moomba Secondary School in Zambia’s Central Province on 26 March 2018 and 29 March 2018 respectively on the theme “Remember Slavery: Triumphs and Struggles for Freedom and Equality.” The activities were organised in partnership with the Government of the Republic of Zambia through the Ministry of General Education.

At both schools, the activities a presentation on the Transatlantic Slave Trade, poster exhibition on notable people of African descent, screening of a film entitled “Familiar Faces/Unexpected Places: A Global African Diaspora” and a discussion with the students.

Students at one school, Moomba, showcased a captivating play and educative poem depicting the effects of the slavery on families and communities. UNIC Lusaka also shared key messages with the public about the commemoration through social media (Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr) as well as bulk SMS, reaching 10,000 mobile phone users.

Students from Moomba Boarding acting a play on slavery and its effects on communities.

Mark Maseko, the National Information Officer, Racheal Nambeya, Staff Assistant and Charles Nonde, Team Assistant, coordinated the activities.

 

UNIC Lusaka commemorates International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust

UNIC Lusaka organised commemorative activities to use the Holocaust to promote tolerance, co-existence, conflict prevention and promote peace among different racial, religious and cultural groups in Zambia.

This year’s Holocaust Remembrance was built around the theme, “Holocaust Remembrance and Education: Our Shared Responsibility”. The theme emphasises the universal dimension of the Holocaust and how education about the tragedy should encourage all humankind to firmly reject all forms of racism, violence and anti-Semitism. Shared values can compel people to

Holocaust Outreach 2018

Boy Scouts viewing the butterfly project poster exhibition at the University of Zambia Chapel Lusaka.

embrace dignity and respect for all.

The Holocaust Memorial Ceremony was held on 15 February 2018, at the University of Zambia in Lusaka. The ceremony had over 100 guests who included school pupils, youths from youth led Organisations, representatives from Faith Based Organisations and representatives from Non-Governmental Organisations.

The event had a lineup of activities which included remarks from the Jewish Community in Zambia, the UN Resident Coordinator’s Representative, and the Ministry of National Guidance and Religious Affairs, a Jewish Prayer, candle lighting and moment of silence for over 6 million Jews that died, a documentary film:  Children of the Holocaust , a discussion around the holocaust and why education on it is very important, and finally closed with a  poster exhibit: The Butterfly Project: Remember the Children of the Holocaust.

UNIC Lusaka organised two (2) school outreach activities at Kafue Day Secondary School and

Naboye Secondary School Students

Naboye Secondary School Students

Naboye Secondary School in Kafue District, this was done as an effort to reach out to pupils not only in the capital city but rather even pupils outside Lusaka. Using the lesson plan that was provided and the guidelines for use of the posters with school pupils, UNIC Lusaka made the school events very interactive, centred around the pupils themselves.

The events at both schools started with poster exhibitions of the, The Butterfly Project: Remember the Children of the Holocaust, to show the impact of the Holocaust on children, then followed by the video presentation of the Path to Nazi Genocide, so that the pupils can fully and better understand the origin of the Holocaust, remarks from the Mayor of Kafue and closed with a discussion session around the poster exhibition and video to get the pupils views, questions and share their understandings.

 

 

 

UNIC commemorates Human Rights Day

Over 50 youths from Lusaka on December 21, 2017, attended a discussion dialogue in commemoration of the Human Rights Day held at the United Nations Information Center (UNIC) Lusaka.

Group photo of participants

The event which was aimed at discussing various issues concerning people’s rights attracted students from various learning institutions such as the University of Zambia (UNZA), Zambia Institute of Chartered Accountants (ZICAS) as well as Zambia Center for Professional Training and Consultancy (ZCTC) among others.

Gilbert Kasulwe, a Student at UNZA expressed concern at the levels at which elderly people’s rights are being abused as most of them get accused of practicing witchcraft because of their age.

“Most elderly people’s rights are being abused because the society thinks everyone who has grown very old and has grey hair is a wizard, and it is high time that these people’s rights are protected because not every old human being is practicing witchcraft,” Said Kasulwe

Meanwhile, in a message on the Human Rights Day from the United Nations (UN) Secretary General Mr. Antonio Guterres, he stated that everyone has the right to speak freely and to participate in decision making that affect the people’s rights.

“All of us have the right to speak freely and participate in decisions that affect our lives. We all have a right to live free from all forms of discrimination and we all have a right to education, health care, economic opportunities and a descent standard of living,” said Mr. Guterres.

He further stated that since the proclamation of the Universal Declaration in 1948, human rights have been one of the three pillars of the UN along with peace and development.